Tag Archives: Vintage clear wax

Raised, Embedded Stencils With Our Newest Texture Plasters

Last post I shared different ways I like to use thicker than paint products.  A favorite of mine is our Texture Plaster, a thick medium like smooth peanut butter, that we offered in BLACK and NEUTRAL .  Earlier this month we added two new colors GREY GOOSE and BROWN BEAR

I created play by play visuals to portray the colors for you.  I basecoated one sample American Paint Company Dollar Bill,  and the other Uncle Sam

Once dry I positioned one of our newer stencil patterns, Florence Damask

I applied the Greygoose Plaster on the Uncle Sam and Brown Bear Plaster on the Dollar Bill.  When I apply thicker dimensional products over a stencil,  I typically use a lightweight plastic card –  used gift cards work great – butter up one edge, and beginning at one side of the stencil glide your buttered edge over the pattern, keep your scraper more parallel to surface so your glide is soft, not choppy and cutting –

Scoop more plaster on the card edge and continue where you left off.  Avoid going back and forth over the pattern as this most often causes the product to bleed underneath resulting in messy edges.  I use my free hand to hold the stencil in place , stencil adhesive and tape are culprits for damaging your newer painted surface underneath.

Its your preference how thick or thin you want to apply your plaster, some areas can be thicker, some thinner.  Leave the excess plaster ON the stencil surface,  don’t try to scrape it off at this point, and once your whole design is covered grab both sides of the stencil and lift directly up 


Be careful, your plaster design is wet and will take awhile to dry.

Lay the stencil on a flat surface –  here I used the cardboard but my favorite is a sheet of plastic or a counter that can be cleaned.   Using your same scraper, scrape harder and firmer now, across the design to retrieve the excess plaster. Save in your container for to reuse again.   If you wait too long to clean it will be much harder to clean the stencil, and your product will get a little clumpy –



Once the product is retrieved, rinse the stencil with warm water, use a soft brush and mild cleaner to get the dried product off.   Again, doing this sooner than later will extend the life of your stencils.

Now check out your raised stencil –

If you have any noticeable areas of bleed/product seep you can try to clean it up a bit – the end of a pencil (eraser) works good, as do mini flat screwdrivers, flat toothpicks etc –      If I am applying thick products onto mirror/glass I typically let the design dry, then clean messy parts using a single razor blade.  If my design is going to be embedded between paint layers then it isn’t as important to have it perfect, but I will remove really bad slops –

Wait until your design is completely dry before moving on. You can attempt to dry with forced heat, but realize you may cause the product to crack.  As you can see in picture below, the design element pointing right was pretty thick, and isn’t completely dried on the inside. I can tell by pushing on it – if its dry it wont move

I decided to continue on anyway, so I could finish the demo.   I got out both paint colors again

and brushed a thinner, watered down version of the paint OVER the whole design –  this embeds the raised stencil between the paint


Avoid covering up the design with too thick of a paint layer. Doing so will cause you to REALLY have to do some heavier sanding to reveal your design –



also note you could brush your color over the design randomly, leaving some of the design showing  – its all personal preference, and I encourage you to play and create many samples, so you can see what works (you like!)  and what doesn’t (yuk)  –



These are covered, 100% and drying.  Won’t take but a couple minutes

Once the surface is dry you can reveal your design.  If you hate sanding you can grab a damp rag and slowly wipe back your finish until you like what you see.  If you use the damp rag method make sure your finish is good and dry, otherwise the paint can wipe off too easily

My preferred method is sand paper (or a mouse sander if your project is big) anywhere from 150-220 grit.  I typically start with 180 grit,  down to 150 if its not releasing fast enough  220 if I have a real sheer paint layer over top.  IF these still aren’t working for you, go as low as 100 but sand slowly, back and forth

Besides revealing shadows of color underneath, sanding the natural chalk/clay of APC paint gives the finish a super soft feel.  When Im satisfied, I’ll take a damp rag and wipe over my finish, to see my result and wipe more in areas that still need to pop –

When you like your result, you’ll want to seal that paint finish.  For these samples I used APC’s all natural Antiquing Wax (clear) and tinted it with our Shimmer Silver Mica Powder.

The Shimmer Silver will add just a hint of grey color to my painted finish, and the light will reflect a shimmery metallic effect.  The more you mix in the stronger your color and shimmer will be.

You can mix Mica Powder’s directly into the wax, no need to turn it into a sludge first

They say you can apply waxes with rags, sponges etc,  I prefer using a soft brush

Work some into your brush then brush/scrub it on, making sure 100% of your paint finish is coated.

Below you can see the top 1/2 has wax applied.  I don’t have it on too heavy – after it sits a minute or two the excess will have to be wiped off –

Top half of the Dollar Bill as well –

Store any extra tinted wax in a snap container and label, so you can use when you need that hint of shimmer silver again

Wiping the excess wax off, with a dry cloth -you dont have to wipe hard, just softly give the surface a wipe to remove that slippy feeling.

I give both samples a flash dry then a quick buff with a dry cloth

 

 

 

If you need some pretty allover or main element stencils, please check out our stencils for purchase.  

We are running the gift bag special, with purchases of $110 (before tax/ship)  you will receive a stencil, texture paint and base paint sample, brush and scraper. 

Have a Blessed  Holiday Weekend!

Happy painting!

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Aged Paper, Plaster and Canvas Workshop

This week we hosted an Aged Paper, Plaster and Canvas Workshop dealing with mounting papers on canvas, building and blending a border to mask the image edge using paint, plaster and wax.

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The Aged Papers are addicting, we stock  a huge assortment, which makes choosing difficult…

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The papers are 11×17,  and can be used in a variety of ways.   You could

  • slip them in a frame as is
  • line a drawer
  • create a focal wall
  • decorate larger furniture surfaces, like inside a china cabinet fabulous-finishes-studio-inspiration-painted-furniture-workshops-metro-detroit-diy-paints-shop-online0243
  • dressing up backs of furniture that will show in a roomfabulous_finishes_online_store_aged_papers (5)
  • adding a design element to furniture panelsfabulous_finishes_studio_chalk_clay_chest_paris_wood

aged papers, fabulous finishes, fairy

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • create a piece of art
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Our current Aged Paper Workshop creates art on canvas.

We begin by painting the canvas with a base color we choose, then we dry.  The paper’s edges are scored, and then the mounting process begins, using our Durable Matte Sealer with a squirt of glue mixed in.

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We work to smooth out wrinkles and bubbles, then once our art-in-process is dry we begin layering a combination of plaster and paint – a little here, a little there, some scraping, blending, fiddling, some more plaster or more paint, blend and fiddle some more…

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This is the longest stretch of the workshop – it relies on each person’s own eye, deciding ‘where’ they want or need more color or dimension, it’s not an exact science,  it’s just a feelie kindof thing,  and it’s cool to watch 🙂

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Once the fiddling is complete,  our canvas art is dried, and then a wax color (or colors) is selected, to finish off our piece.   I love American Paint Company’s Vintage Waxes – I rave about them a lot, and for good reason – they are simply the best!

I use  APC’s Vintage Clear Wax to create colored waxes by adding pigment tints – like one canvas used a blue wax in the final pass – I’ll add our mica powders to create various shimmer wax colors as well.   I create each color or shimmer into it’s own snap-deli container, so it’s an easy go-to-grab when I need it.

We used a variety of wax colors to finish off the canvas’s –  APC’s Dark Wax, which gives an umber vintage effect, and APC Wax custom tinted to Brass, Aged Gold, Pearl, Pewter, Shimmered Silver, Blue, and Black.

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Pretty fun night – thank you ladies!!

The plaster we use, to blend and layer the edges is Caromal’s Perfect Plaster

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It’s unlike any of our other plasters – it’s whippy, think paint folded with whipped crème, then sprinkle in some seeds or specks of little things that bust open when you scrape them.   I wont’ apply the paper’s without it.

It’s also cool as a wall finish, which is it’s original intent (LOL)

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Have a fabulous Spring Weekend!

paints, sundries and accessories – fabfinisher.com.